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Born in the Czech Republic and described by Gramophone as “on the verge of greatness”, Jakub Hrůša is Music Director and Chief Conductor of the Prague Philharmonia and Principal Guest Conductor of Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra. He is a regular guest with many of Europe’s leading orchestras, including the Philharmonia Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Finnish Radio Symphony, SWR Symphony Stuttgart, WDR Symphony Cologne and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.  In 2010 he became the youngest conductor since 1949 to lead the opening concert of the Prague Spring Festival. Jakub Hrůša made his North American debut in 2009, and has since appeared with The Cleveland Orchestra, Washington National Symphony, the Symphony Orchestras of Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and Seattle, and the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa. In the same year he made his Australian debut with the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, followed by visits to Melbourne and Sydney Symphony Orchestras. He is also a regular visitor to Asia where, in addition to his commitments with Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, he led the Prague Philharmonia on a major tour of Japan in 2012. He has also appeared as a guest conductor

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Born in the Czech Republic and described by Gramophone as “on the verge of greatness”, Jakub Hrůša is Music Director and Chief Conductor of the Prague Philharmonia and Principal Guest Conductor of Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra.

He is a regular guest with many of Europe’s leading orchestras, including the Philharmonia Orchestra, Czech Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, Finnish Radio Symphony, SWR Symphony Stuttgart, WDR Symphony Cologne and the BBC Symphony Orchestra.  In 2010 he became the youngest conductor since 1949 to lead the opening concert of the Prague Spring Festival.

Jakub Hrůša made his North American debut in 2009, and has since appeared with The Cleveland Orchestra, Washington National Symphony, the Symphony Orchestras of Dallas, Houston, Atlanta and Seattle, and the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa. In the same year he made his Australian debut with the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, followed by visits to Melbourne and Sydney Symphony Orchestras.

He is also a regular visitor to Asia where, in addition to his commitments with Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra, he led the Prague Philharmonia on a major tour of Japan in 2012. He has also appeared as a guest conductor with the Hong Kong Philharmonic, Seoul Philharmonic, New Japan Philharmonic and Osaka Philharmonic.

Highlights of the coming season include a major series of concerts with the Philharmonia Orchestra devoted to the music of Dvořák, Suk and Janáček, which will be presented at the Royal Festival Hall in London and elsewhere in the UK; and debuts with Los Angeles Philharmonic, Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Russian National Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Radio Philharmonic, the Oslo Philharmonic Orchestra and Finnish National Opera (Jenůfa).

In the field of opera, Jakub Hrůša made his Glyndebourne Festival and Tour debuts in 2008 conducting Carmen, followed by Don Giovanni (Festival and Tour 2010), The Turn of the Screw (Festival 2011), La bohème (Tour 2011) and Rusalka (Tour 2012). He has also led productions for Royal Danish Opera (Boris Godunov) and Prague National Theatre (The Cunning Little Vixen; Rusalka).

As a recording artist, he has released six discs for Supraphon including a critically-acclaimed live recording of Smetana’s Má vlast from the Prague Spring Festival in 2010. Other recordings include the Tchaikovsky and Bruch violin concertos with Nicola Benedetti and the Czech Philharmonic for Universal and, more recently, a live recording of Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique with Tokyo Metropolitan Symphony Orchestra for Octavia Records in Japan.

Jakub Hrůša studied conducting at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague where his teachers included Jiří Bělohlávek. He is currently President of the International Martinů Circle.

August 2013. Previously dated versions are not authorized for publication. Please contact IMG Artists if you wish to edit this biography in any way.

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Reviews

"Hrůša's direction of the piece [Praga] glowed with conviction from first to last."

The Guardian

"Hrůša and the Philharmonia found just the right note of latent anxiety"

BachTrack

"[Hrůša is] ‘an invigorating presence, leaping off the balls of his feet as he steers an orchestra through something middle European or beyond’"

The Times

"Outstanding! Beg, borrow or steal a ticket for the final concert"

Classical Source

"You just never know when lightning will strike in a concert hall. It happened Thursday night at the Meyerhoff, where conductor Jakub Hrusa made his Baltimore Symphony Orchestra debut..."

Baltimore Sun

"[Hrusa’s] performance was wonderful to hear"

Ottawa Citizen

"Throughout, Hrusa proved an engaging maestro whose demonstrative nature meant occasional short flights with feet off the podium, while summoning crispness and expressive robustness from the ensemble. "

Los Angeles Times

"Remember Hrusa’s name; there’s a reason why Gramophone magazine dubbed him “on the verge of greatness."

Cincinnati.com

"...conductor Jakub Hrůša led a solid and spirited performance... "

Music and Beyond, Ottawa

"At its dark heart lies Jakub Hrusa's quite astonishing conducting | Glyndebourne 'Turn of the Screw' 2012"

BBC Music Magazine

"Jakub Hrusa leads the London Philharmonic in an instinctual, perversely accented, gut-wrenching reading | Glyndebourne 'Turn of the Screw' 2012"

International Record Review

"At the lecturn, Hrusa co-ordinates...bold orchestral storms. - Asrael Symphony with SWR Stuttgart"

Der Rheinpflaz

"Make no mistake: Jakub Hrůša is climbing to the top by dint of penetrating musicianship and with the technical means to achieve it. "

Classical Source

"Jakub Hrusa... in his final production as music director of the Glyndebourne Tour shows notable affinity with his native Czech repertoire... [He] concentrates on the music's melancholy warmth, evoking all the ebb and flow suggestive of Rusalka's forest pool."

The Guardian

"Hrůŝa conducted the Dvořák EighthSymphony from memory and with great flair. Here Dvořák wanted an untroubled, cheerful piece to contrast with the many dark, brooding romantic symphonies. Hrůŝa’s special reverence, affection and familiarity with the Symphony produced a gorgeous performance."

Clevelandclassical.com

"From the start, [Jakub Hrusa] demonstrated an authoritative technique on the podium…his gestures.. were.. models of baton efficiency, giving the orchestra exactly what it needed to execute his emphatic and often muscular interpretations. In Rimsky-Korsakov's extensive reworking of Mussorgsky's "Night on Bald Mountain," Hrusa set a no-nonsense tempo, brisk but not overly fast, which highlighted the dramatic tension of the music. Hrusa's clear baton was especially helpful in maintaining a Szell-like accuracy of ensemble during the work's hectic pages, while his balances kept Rimsky-Korsakov's heavy orchestral textures admirably clear. To conclude the program, Hrusa led an impassioned reading of Dvorak's Symphony No. 8 in G major that was as nearly perfect as one could want. In its vigorous opening allegro, alternately lyrical and heroic adagio, dancing triple-time allegretto and ringing allegro finale, Dvorak's eighth might be seen as the apotheosis of the 19th-century Bohemian symphony, and Hrusa's interpretation made a strong case for such a thesis. "

Cleveland.com

"Hrusa impressed with his explosive energy coupled with a mature expressive range, and it was obvious that the players liked the new kid on the block. Little wonder that last year he was tipped as being one of a few potentially great young conductors. "

Blacktown Advocat

"Hrusa worked with the players to create a continuously evolving, subtly changing textural landscape where (partly because of the presence of the saxophone) they seemed to be creating new instruments like Schubert does at the beginning of the Unfinished by pairing oboe and clarinet. Altogether, the orchestra and Hrusa combined to produce a second half highly charged with excitement and precision "

Australian Stage

"[Jakub Hrusa’s] reading of Mussorgsky's Night on Bald Mountain bristled with demonic menace. Spiky string articulation, taut percussion and brass entries, and snappy focus in the winds brought Rimsky-Korsakov's tempestuous arrangement to life,"

The Australian

"Jakub Hrůša is an outstanding young conductor, discriminating and focussed as well as possessing the ability to energise musicians."

Classical Source

"[La bohème], faithfully revived by Lee Blakeley, with an attractive young cast and the brilliant Czech conductor Jakub Hrusa leading the excellent GoT Orchestra…looks the probable hit of the tour…La bohème has rarely seemed so fresh. "

Sunday Times

"Prefacing the rarely played Janácek was a Czech chestnut, The Moldau , Bedrich Smetana’s portrayal of a river’s progress from burbling spring to broad surge. But Hrusa and the DSO made it sound like a brand-new piece, its phrases boldly rising and falling, its peasant dance just earthy enough, its storm quite stormy indeed"

Dallas Morning News

"But what I hadn't suspected was that the young Czech conductor Jakub Hrusa would offer such a thrillingly visceral, angry and churned-up reading of the score. Galvanising the LPO to playing of scalding brilliance, Hrusa carefully ratcheted up the tension in the early scenes and brought the drama to the boil with an almost daemonic intensity. This wasn't a nice creepy bedtime story, but something reaching dangerously into the darker reaches of human nature.This is truly great opera."

The Telegraph

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Discography