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Praised for his rich, gorgeous tone and playing that can range from lovely and elegant, to vigorous with head-banging, rock star energy, German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser has been hailed by Gramophone Magazine as “one of the finest among the astonishing gallery of young virtuoso cellists.” Johannes has performed with the world’s leading orchestras such as the Berlin Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, London Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Concertgebouw Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Bayerische Rundfunk Orchestra, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Munich Philharmonic, Tokyo Symphony and Israel Philharmonic. He works regularly with conductors of the highest level including Riccardo Muti, Lorin Maazel, Mariss Jansons, Valery Gergiev, Zubin Mehta, Vladimir Jurowski, Franz Welser-Möst, Manfred Honeck, Christian Thielemann, Pierre Boulez, Paavo Jarvi and Semyon Bychkov. The 2013-14 season includes debuts with the London Philharmonic, Baltimore Symphony, Oregon Symphony and Houston Symphony as well as returns to the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Bournemouth Symphony, Deutsche-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, WDR Cologne and Essen Philharmonic.

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Praised for his rich, gorgeous tone and playing that can range from lovely and elegant, to vigorous with head-banging, rock star energy, German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser has been hailed by Gramophone Magazine as “one of the finest among the astonishing gallery of young virtuoso cellists.” Johannes has performed with the world’s leading orchestras such as the Berlin Philharmonic, New York Philharmonic, Chicago Symphony, London Symphony, Cleveland Orchestra, Concertgebouw Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Bayerische Rundfunk Orchestra, Hong Kong Philharmonic, Munich Philharmonic, Tokyo Symphony and Israel Philharmonic. He works regularly with conductors of the highest level including Riccardo Muti, Lorin Maazel, Mariss Jansons, Valery Gergiev, Zubin Mehta, Vladimir Jurowski, Franz Welser-Möst, Manfred Honeck, Christian Thielemann, Pierre Boulez, Paavo Jarvi and Semyon Bychkov.

The 2013-14 season includes debuts with the London Philharmonic, Baltimore Symphony, Oregon Symphony and Houston Symphony as well as returns to the Los Angeles Philharmonic, Bournemouth Symphony, Deutsche-Sinfonieorchester Berlin, WDR Cologne and Essen Philharmonic.

Johannes has gained a reputation for his exquisite performances and wide ranging repertoire, much of it recorded on his extensive award-winning discography.His affinity for new music has brought him much attention from leading conductors such as Pierre Boulez, who invited him to make his U.S. debut with the Chicago Symphony on the Rands Concerto.  Johannes is an enthusiastic advocate for the electric cello which he uses to explore new possibilities in sound as well as for improvisation. In  October 2012 he premiered “ Magnetar”, a concerto for electric cello by Enrico Chapela, which Johannes performed with Los Angeles Philharmonic conducted by Gustavo Dudamel and in the 2013-14 season Johannes will continue this relationship with the Los Angeles Philharmonic by performing Michel van der Aa's cello concerto “Up-close”.

Johannes is committed to reaching out to young audiences, from kindergarten to college and beyond. From his 2010 American tour with toy pianist Phyllis Chen “Sounding Off: A Fresh Look at Classical Music”, to outreach activities on campuses and performances in alternative venues, Johannes aims to present classical music in terms with which listeners of all ages can connect.

A dedicated chamber musician, Johannes has played with: Joshua Bell, Emanuel Ax, Leonidas Kavakos, Menahem Pressler, James Ehnes, Midori and Jonathan Biss. He has also performed at many festivals including the Verbier, Schleswig-Holstein, Gstaad and Kissinger festivals, the Mehta Chamber Music Festival and the Colorado, Seattle and Brevard music festivals.

Johannes has received two ECHO Klassik awards and the Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik for his recordings on Hänssler Classics. His concerto debut disc, which features the complete works of Saint-Saëns for cello and orchestra with the Stuttgart Radio Symphony Orchestra, was honoured as one of Classics Today’s Top 10 CDs of 2008. Following an album of works by Britten, Bridge and Bax, a disc of Martinu, Hindemith and Honegger concerti received great acclaim and was listed for the prestigious “Preis der Deutschen Schallplattenkritik”. The latest concerto album of the Britten Cello Symphony and the Shostakovich Cello Concerto No. 1 with WDR Cologne and Pietari Inkinen was released in January 2012.

Born into a musical family in 1979 as a dual citizen of Germany and Canada, Johannes began studying the cello at the age of eight and became a student of Professor David Geringas in 1997. He was the top prize winner at the 2002 Tchaikovsky Competition, in addition to being awarded the Special Prize for his interpretation of the Rococo Variations.

A voracious reader of everything from Kafka to Collins, and an avid outdoorsman, Johannes Moser is a keen hiker and mountain biker in what little spare time he has.

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Reviews

"Then there were the bravura flourishes of the strapping and exuberant German-Canadian cellist Johannes Moser…who threw himself bodily into a performance of Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1… Mr. Moser’s (performance) fought everyone on equal terms, and he brought the house down."

James R. Oestreich, New York Times

"...Johannes Moser...played Shostakovich's motivic train wreck as a nervous breakdown so massive that this excellent cellist seemed to have his own nanosecond collapse. The perhaps-unintended gaps in sound felt so emotionally bereft as to be beyond music. Moser's recent recording of the concerto was no preparation for his fearlessly manic intensity on Thursday. He maintained much control, to judge from his smartly varied vibrato, but tossed aside typical coloristic effects for the most visceral expression possible. Nézet-Séguin urged him on and, during bows, showed his gratitude by going down on bended knee. "

David Patrick Stearns, Philly.com

"Johannes Moser tore the audience apart as soloist in the first cello concerto by Saint-Saens… Moser attacked the peice with flaming elegance. He has a bravura technique, lush sound, but also natural temperament."

Jan Brachmann, Berliner Zeitung

"Moser's tone is beautiful, and he was richly expressive in the sublimely sad slow movement"

Mark Swed, LA Times

"His tone was big and warm where needed, and he proved himself capable of some Rostropovich-like wild abandon…he was consistently eloquent."

John Allison, The Telegraoh

"Moser('s)...performance of exceptional poise and presence...was one of the season’s most rewarding and unforgettable concerts."

Hilary Finch, The Times

"...Johannes Moser...captured the work's thumb-on-the-nose humour and its historical seriousness equally well."

Guy Dammann, The Guardian

"…he did not merely play, but lived the piece…Moser…is a world leader in his field."

Christina Pledges, GießenerAllgemeine

"His superb and impeccable technique made for an exciting narrative…"

Stefano Ragni, Il Giornale Dell'umbria

"He was a delight. He enthusiastically anticipated each turn of phrase. His tone sang and carried easily. He engaged the orchestra musicians, and they seemed to grow better by the measure when playing with him. "

Mark Swed, LA Times

"And then came Moser: ka-boom!...Brilliant cellist Johannes Moser…One mean musician, Moser played the Russian's extravagantly dark and beautiful work with rare technical clarity and directness of expression. His tightly focused sound and razor-sharp projection had an immediate effect. "

Richard Scheinin, San Jose Mercury News

"Enter the young cellist Johannes Moser, whose dynamic presence filled Elgar's Cello Concerto with unflinching energy and revealing fascination. He's a big lad, and so is the exuberant tone he draws from his instrument. He captured the mercurial essence of Elgar's music, with a zing of freshness. All of this took time to settle, partly due to Litton's seemingly over-managed beat. But as the American conductor loosened up and let the music take care of itself, everything slipped into a well-oiled groove. In the end, it was a captivating experience, Moser's return to the opening flourish in the final bars hitting the whole point of this concerto well and truly home. "

Kenneth Walton, The Scotsman

"The cello part was fast, furious, rhythmic and not particularly notable until the cadenza at the end of the first movement, which Moser improvised. Here the cello wailed and wa-wa-ed and did things that an electric guitar can do and other things that it can’t do. Moser is known to be an elegant cellist."

Los Angeles Times

"Schumann’s Concerto for Cello, played by Enrico Mainardi in1961, was this time entrusted to Johannes Moser. He interpreted the piece as though it were a thought or reflection, giving it vitality as well as a feeling of improvisation, whilst still managing to retain control over the music . His pianissimo kept the listener riveted, and through his cooperation with Mehta and the Solo-Cellist Olaf Maninger, he was able to maintain the inner tension of the melody."

Sybill Mahlke, Der Tagesspiegel

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Discography