back to top

Biography 507 words

Download biography as pdf Download biography as word doc

Acclaimed for her lyricism and compelling stage presence, violinist RACHEL LEE PRIDAY has appeared as soloist with leading international orchestras, including the Chicago, Saint Louis, Houston, Seattle, and National Symphonies, the Boston Pops, and the Berlin Staatskapelle. Recent highlights include performances of Paganini’s Violin Concerto No. 1 with the Buffalo Philharmonic and JoAnn Falletta in June 2013 under short notice, as well as extensive interdisciplinary collaborations with Ballet San Jose and conductor George Daugherty. A graduate of Harvard University, she possesses a wide-ranging repertoire and is particularly fascinated with music’s connections to literature and language. This season, she performs works ranging from the Korngold and Elgar Violin Concertos, to contemporary Scandinavian music, to transcriptions of the Bach Cello Suites for violin. Previous solo engagements have included appearances with the Colorado Symphony, Rochester Philharmonic, and Aspen Sinfonia at the Aspen Music Festival. She has performed at the Singapore Sun Festival and in Korea several times, including repeat engagements with the Seoul Philharmonic, the KBS Symphony under the direction of Dmitri Kitaenko, and a four-city tour of the country with the State Symphony Cappella of Russia. During the course of her career, she has collaborated with acclaimed conductors including Mikko

read more...

Acclaimed for her lyricism and compelling stage presence, violinist RACHEL LEE PRIDAY has appeared as soloist with leading international orchestras, including the Chicago, Saint Louis, Houston, Seattle, and National Symphonies, the Boston Pops, and the Berlin Staatskapelle. Recent highlights include performances of Paganini’s Violin Concerto No. 1 with the Buffalo Philharmonic and JoAnn Falletta in June 2013 under short notice, as well as extensive interdisciplinary collaborations with Ballet San Jose and conductor George Daugherty.

A graduate of Harvard University, she possesses a wide-ranging repertoire and is particularly fascinated with music’s connections to literature and language. This season, she performs works ranging from the Korngold and Elgar Violin Concertos, to contemporary Scandinavian music, to transcriptions of the Bach Cello Suites for violin.

Previous solo engagements have included appearances with the Colorado Symphony, Rochester Philharmonic, and Aspen Sinfonia at the Aspen Music Festival. She has performed at the Singapore Sun Festival and in Korea several times, including repeat engagements with the Seoul Philharmonic, the KBS Symphony under the direction of Dmitri Kitaenko, and a four-city tour of the country with the State Symphony Cappella of Russia. During the course of her career, she has collaborated with acclaimed conductors including Mikko Franck, Semyon Bychkov, Keith Lockhart, JoAnn Falletta, Marvin Hamlisch, and Michael Christie.

Rachel’s frequent recital appearances have brought her to such venues as the Mostly Mozart Festival, the Kansas City Harriman-Jewell Discovery Series, Ravinia’s “Rising Star” series, the Matinee Musicale series in Cincinnati, and the Dame Myra Hess Memorial series at the Chicago Cultural Center. In Europe, she has performed on the Louvre recital series in Paris, the Verbier Festival, the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern Festival, and with the Graz Philharmonic. She has been a featured artist at the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra’s “Chamber Music Marathon” and the Moritzburg Festival in Germany.

Rachel has been profiled in the Los Angeles Times, The New Yorker, Family Circle Magazine, and The Strad Magazine. Her television credits include appearances on the Disney Channel, “Fiddling for the Future” on PBS with Itzhak Perlman, an “American Masters” documentary about the Juilliard School, and the 2000 Grammy Awards ceremony in Los Angeles. Born in 1988 in Chicago, she made her orchestral debut at the Aspen Music Festival at the age of nine, and performed at the 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights at the United Nations.

Rachel’s teachers include Itzhak Perlman, Dorothy DeLay, and Robert Mann, with whom she studied at the Pre-College Division of The Juilliard School. She holds a B.A. in English literature from Harvard University, and in May 2011 received a master’s degree, studying with Miriam Fried at the New England Conservatory through its joint dual degree program with Harvard College. In addition to her musical career, Rachel has worked on the Charlie Rose show, at The Paris Review, and on the staff of The New Yorker magazine. She performs on a Nicolo Gagliano violin (Naples, 1760), double-purfled with fleurs-de-lis, named Alejandro.

www.violinistrachellee.com

back to top

Photos

back to top

Reviews

"Lee combines the passion and impetuosity of youth with a depth and maturity of a musician two or three times her age."

The Gazette

"She makes her instrument sing like the finest of coloratura sopranos."

St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Her sound is big and luscious enough to ride the orchestral crests comfortably, yet supple enough to make the singing paragraphs soar. Her bow work combines dazzling dexterity with an idiomatic feel for Prokofiev's quirky Slavic rhythms. Not only did she pour out endless floods of ardent lyricism in the slow movement, but she also dispatched the finale's whirling bravura with irresistible panache."

The Chicago Tribune

"It's not just her technique either, although clearly there's nothing she can't do on the fingerboard or with her bow. No, what's most impressive is that she is already an artist who can make the music sing... And though her tone is voluptuous and sexy where it counts, she concluded the 'Intermezzo' with such charm that her listeners responded with a collective chuckle of approval as she finished"

The Baltimore Sun

"The young musician...seems not to play the music but rather to tap into its existence with uncanny maturity... Lee plays with assurance and impeccable technique, rather than relying on the flash and drama many youthful performers adopt. This is not to say that she lacks fire; her cadenzas, particularly the one in the first movement, demanded attention and rewarded the listener with some breathtaking moments. But it was the second movement that captured the heart. The silken, pure tone emerged from the orchestra and rose above it like gossamer floating over waves on a sunlit day. Lee's interpretation of that adagio movement was as refreshing and sustaining as a prayer."

The Maui News

"When she made her first entrance into the concerto's brisk first movement, her violin sang with a silvery fluidity that was almost otherworldly. With sharp articulation and vivid expressiveness, she commanded the piece, the orchestra and the riveted audience with poise and self-confidence that exceeded her years."

Syracuse Post Standard

"She played the Violin Concerto with a rich, mellifluous sound and negotiated the work’s demanding running passages with chiseled clarity. Lee was particularly eloquent in the concerto’s second movement. She brought a dazzling, forceful technique to bear on the third movement."

Greenville Online

"...The Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1, composed by Max Bruch... again nothing short of a display of incredible talents – nothing short of exquisite. Words could not describe this violinist’s talents."

San Francisco Examiner

"In the racehorse Finale, Lee’s execution of the bouncing spiccato passages (in Paganini’s Violin Concerto No. 1) was truly dazzling. "

Buffalo News