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Canadian tenor Roger Honeywell has been acclaimed by Anthony Tommasini as a performer who brings “burnished sound and crisp diction to sweeping vocal lines, full of leaps and dips." In the 2016-2017 season, Mr. Honeywell will return to Boston Lyric Opera for Don José in Carmen, Calgary Opera as Eisenstein in Die Fledermaus and Capt. Vere in Billy Budd with Des Moines Metro Opera. Internationally, he will join Royal Opera House, Covent Garden for Thomas Adès, The Exterminating Angel. In the 2015-2016 season, Roger Honeywell made his company debut with the Théâtre du Châtelet as Torasso in Sondheim's Passion, Boston Lyric Opera as Danilo in The Merry Widow, as joined the roster of LA Opera for Jake Heggie’s Moby Dick. Highlights of Mr. Honeywell’s 2014-2015 season included his return to Santa Fe Opera for the world premiere of Jennifer Higdon’s Cold Mountain, in the role of Veasey, directed by Leonard Foglia. He also returned to Calgary Opera as Nikolaus Sprink for the Canadian premiere of Kevin Puts’ Silent Night, Eisenstein in Die Fledermaus with Vancouver Opera, and Danilo in The Merry Widow at

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Canadian tenor Roger Honeywell has been acclaimed by Anthony Tommasini as a performer who brings “burnished sound and crisp diction to sweeping vocal lines, full of leaps and dips." In the 2016-2017 season, Mr. Honeywell will return to Boston Lyric Opera for Don José in Carmen, Calgary Opera as Eisenstein in Die Fledermaus and Capt. Vere in Billy Budd with Des Moines Metro Opera. Internationally, he will join Royal Opera House, Covent Garden for Thomas Adès, The Exterminating Angel.

In the 2015-2016 season, Roger Honeywell made his company debut with the Théâtre du Châtelet as Torasso in Sondheim's Passion, Boston Lyric Opera as Danilo in The Merry Widow, as joined the roster of LA Opera for Jake Heggie’s Moby Dick. Highlights of Mr. Honeywell’s 2014-2015 season included his return to Santa Fe Opera for the world premiere of Jennifer Higdon’s Cold Mountain, in the role of Veasey, directed by Leonard Foglia. He also returned to Calgary Opera as Nikolaus Sprink for the Canadian premiere of Kevin Puts’ Silent Night, Eisenstein in Die Fledermaus with Vancouver Opera, and Danilo in The Merry Widow at Michigan Opera Theatre.

Mr. Honeywell’s recent seasons have featured performances with Des Moines Metro Opera as Peter Grimes, which Opera News lauded as “a career-defining interpretation,” delivering “a prodigious vocal performance impressive for its remarkable skill in dynamic shading, as well as its dramatic power”; Lyric Opera of Chicago as Aegist in Sir David McVicar’s production of Elektra conducted by Sir Andrew Davis; Portland Opera to sing Cavaradossi in Tosca and Pinkerton in Madama Butterfly; Vancouver Opera to sing Frederic in Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance; Canadian Opera Company as Bob Boles in Peter Grimes; Theatro Municipal do Rio de Janeiro as Captain Vere in Marcelo Lombardero’s production of Billy Budd, originally staged in Santiago, Chile; Pacific Opera Victoria as Bacchus in Ariadne auf Naxos; Fort Worth Opera as Cavaradossi in Tosca; and the Bard Music Festival as Midas in Die Liebe der Dannae.

Career highlights include the role of James Nolan in Doctor Atomic with the Lyric Opera of Chicago, which he then reprised with the Metropolitan Opera for his debut there in 2008; Danilo in The Merry Widow with the Lyric Opera of Chicago; with Santa Fe Opera in Lewis Spratlan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Life Is a Dream; his role debut of Cavaradossi in Tosca with the Florida Grand Opera; Troilus in Troilus and Cressida with the Opera Theatre of St. Louis; Narraboth in Salome with the Opéra de Montréal; the American premiere of Tan Dun’s Tea: A Mirror of Soul with Santa Fe Opera; the world premiere of Ricky Ian Gordon’s The Grapes of Wrath at the Minnesota Opera and Utah Opera; Macduff in Macbeth with the Opéra de Montréal; his debut with the Fort Worth Opera as Don Jose in Carmen; and a world premiere of Paul Moravec’s The Letter with the Santa Fe Opera. He has also made role debuts of Erik in the Flying Dutchman for Utah Opera and Don Jose in Carmen with Opera Calgary to great critical acclaim, as well as Rodolfo in La Boheme for the Opera Company of Philadelphia and Dick Johnson in La Fanciulla del West for the Glimmerglass Opera.

Other notable performances include the role of Laca in a new production of Jenufa by Jonathan Miller for the Glimmerglass Opera, a new production of Daphne in the role of Leukippos at the New York City Opera, Pinkerton in a new production of Madama Butterfly by Jun Kaneko for Opera Omaha, and the world premiere of Margaret Garner for Michigan Opera Theatre, Cincinnati Opera and the Opera Company of Philadelphia. After a career as an actor in Canada working at many of the country’s foremost companies, including five seasons with the Shaw Festival and five seasons with the Stratford Shakespeare Festival in Canada, Mr. Honeywell joined the Canadian Opera Company’s young artist program, where he was heard in the title role of Giulio Cesare by Antonio Sartario and Narraboth in Salome. He then joined the Lyric Opera of Chicago’s Ryan Opera Center, where he sang the role of Frederick in The Pirates of Penzance opposite Elizabeth Futral.

In addition to his opera engagements, Mr. Honeywell has performed concert work with the Montreal Symphony, Toronto Symphony, Tucson Symphony, Albany Symphony, Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, Calgary Philharmonic, Nashville Symphony, and the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra.

He is a graduate of the Ryerson Theatre School in Toronto and has received numerous awards, among which are a Dora Mavor Moore Award for his role of Arnaud de Tilh in The House of Martin Guerre, a Maureen Forrester Award, and a Tyrone Guthrie Award from the Stratford Festival.

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Reviews

"Honeywell's stage sense is second to none, so his judiciously nuanced dramatic performance was foreseeable; the tenor has come into his own technically as well and delivered a prodigious vocal performance impressive for its remarkable skill in dynamic shading, as well as its dramatic power. All was delivered with a catch in the voice reflective of misery itself. This bodes to be a career-defining interpretation. "

Mark Thomas Ketterson, Opera News

"As the boozy, proud Count Danilovitch, Canadian tenor Roger Honeywell brought considerable vocal weight to a talky role that gave him few chances to display his voice at its best. Honeywell’s chemistry with [Deborah] Voigt was palpable in Act II, kicked off with a cavalry duet that, for all its silliness, gave the two stars room to play both vocally and comedically. Honeywell never missed an opportunity for fun, including the male ensemble’s near-slapstick rendition of “Girls, Girls, Girls,” complete with kick line coda."

Jennifer Goltz-Taylor, Opera News

"Roger Honeywell gives the performance of a lifetime, throwing himself into the role of the tortured Segismundo as if he were singing Tristan, holding nothing back and attacking the punishing vocal line with alarming intensity."

Lawrence A. Johnson, The Classical Review

"The tenor Roger Honeywell, in splendid voice as Segismundo, charts the course of a character who initially delivers a self-pitying rant yet ultimately proves fit to rule."

George Loomis, Financial Times

"The all-demanding central role of Segismundo requires that rare breed of singer, a dramatic tenor, and Roger Honeywell more than fits the bill with his ideal mix of power and flexibility. In a remarkable, all-encompassing performance, he adroitly handles the role's vocal extremes and vividly conveys the character's transformation and ultimate redemption."

Kyle MacMillan, The Denver Post

"The role calls for a heroic tenor, and this production has one in the young, athletic Roger Honeywell, who brought burnished sound and crisp diction to the sweeping vocal lines, full of leaps and dips."

Anthony Tommasini, The New York Times

"As the Maxim’s-loving Danilo, Roger Honeywell was ideal in both characterization and vocalism. The Canadian tenor’s flexible voice is well-suited to Lehar’s buoyant score and he delivered warmly idiomatic singing in the operetta’s set pieces. Honeywell also managed the farce and dialogue with a theater hand’s natural ease, making a well-rounded character out the pleasure-loving, commitmentphobe playboy who has met his match in the hard-to-get Hanna. The tenor seemed to having a high time, throwing himself into the ensembles and dancing with an energy that was infectious."

Lawrence A. Johnson, Chicago Classical Review

"Roger Honeywell used his assertive dramatic tenor ably as Hammond; his duets with Ms. Racette were among the evening’s vocal highlights."

Allan Kozinn, New York Times