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One of today’s most sought-after and dynamic conductors, acclaimed worldwide for his incisive musicianship and adventurous artistic commitment, Vladimir Jurowski was born in Moscow, and completed the first part of his musical studies at the Music College of the Moscow Conservatory. In 1990 he relocated with his family to Germany, continuing his studies at the Musikhochschule of Dresden and Berlin, studying conducting with Rolf Reuter and vocal coaching with Semion Skigin. In 1995 he made his international debut at the Wexford Festival conducting Rimsky-Korsakov’s May Night, and the same year saw his debut at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden with Nabucco. Vladimir Jurowski has been Music Director of Glyndebourne Festival Opera since 2001 and in 2003 was appointed Principal Guest Conductor of the London Philharmonic Orchestra, becoming the orchestra's Principal Conductor in September 2007. He also holds the titles of Principal Artist of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and Artistic Director of the Russian State Academic Symphony Orchestra. He has also held the positions of First Kapellmeister of the Komische Oper Berlin (1997-2001), Principal Guest Conductor of the Teatro Comunale di Bologna (2000-2003), and Principal Guest Conductor of the Russian National Orchestra (2005-2009). Vladimir Jurowski is a regular guest with many of the world's leading orchestras in both Europe and North America, including the Berlin and Oslo Philharmonic Orchestras, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, Chicago Symphony, Tonhalle Orchester Zurich, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Mahler Chamber Orchestra and the Dresden Staatskapelle. Highlights of the 2012/13 season and beyond include his debuts with the Vienna Philharmonic, Boston Symphony, New York Philharmonic, NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo and San Francisco Symphony, and return visits to the Chicago Symphony, Chamber Orchestra of Europe, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, St Petersburg Philharmonic, Tonhalle Orchester Zurich, Accademia di Santa Cecilia and the Philadelphia Orchestra.

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One of today’s most sought-after and dynamic conductors, acclaimed worldwide for his incisive musicianship and adventurous artistic commitment, Vladimir Jurowski was born in Moscow, and completed the first part of his musical studies at the Music College of the Moscow Conservatory. In 1990 he relocated with his family to Germany, continuing his studies at the Musikhochschule of Dresden and Berlin, studying conducting with Rolf Reuter and vocal coaching with Semion Skigin. In 1995 he made his international debut at the Wexford Festival conducting Rimsky-Korsakov’s May Night, and the same year saw his debut at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden with Nabucco.
Vladimir Jurowski was appointed Principal Guest Conductor of the London Philharmonic Orchestra in 2003, becoming the orchestra's Principal Conductor in September 2007. He also holds the titles of Principal Artist of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment and Artistic Director of the Russian State Academic Symphony Orchestra. He has also held the positions of First Kapellmeister of the Komische Oper Berlin (1997-2001), Principal Guest Conductor of the Teatro Comunale di Bologna (2000-2003), Principal Guest Conductor of the Russian National Orchestra (2005-2009) and Music Director of Glyndebourne Festival Opera (2001-2013).
Vladimir Jurowski has appeared on the podium with many of the world's leading orchestras in both Europe and North America, including the Berlin and Vienna Philharmonic Orchestras, the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, Philadelphia Orchestra, Boston Symphony, Chicago Symphony, Tonhalle Orchester Zurich, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, and the Staatskapelle Dresden. Highlights of the 2013/14 season and beyond include his debuts with the New York Philharmonic, NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo and San Francisco Symphony, tours with the Chamber Orchestra of Europe and Mahler Chamber Orchestra, and return visits to the Chicago Symphony, Cleveland and Philadelphia Orchestras, the Rundfunk Sinfonie-orchester Berlin, and the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia.
Jurowski made his debut at the Metropolitan Opera New York in 1999 with Rigoletto, and has since returned for Jenufa, The Queen of Spades and Hansel und Gretel. He has conducted Parsifal and Wozzeck at the Welsh National Opera, War and Peace at the Opera National de Paris, Eugene Onegin at Teatro alla Scala Milan, Ruslan and Ludmila at the Bolshoi Theatre, and Iolanta and Der Teufel von Loudon at the Dresden Semperoper, as well as Die Zauberflöte, La Cenerentola, Otello, Macbeth, Falstaff, Tristan und Isolde, Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg, Don Giovanni, The Rake’s Progress, The Cunning Little Vixen, Ariadne auf Naxos and Peter Eötvös’ Love and Other Demons at Glyndebourne Opera. In 2013 he returns to the Metropolitan Opera for Die Frau ohne Schatten, and future engagements include Moses und Aron at the Komische Oper Berlin and The Fiery Angel at the Bayerische Staatsoper in Munich.
Jurowski’s discography includes the first ever recording of the cantata Exile by Giya Kancheli for ECM, Meyerbeer’s L’etoile du Nord for Marco Polo, Massenet’s Werther for BMG, and a series of records for PentaTone with the Russian National Orchestra, including Tchaikovsky's Orchestral Suite No. 3 and Stravinsky's Divertimento from Le baiser de la fée, Shostakovich Symphonies No 1 & 6, Prokofiev Symphony No 5, and Tchaikovsky’s Hamlet Incidental Music. The London Philharmonic Orchestra has released a wide selection of his live recordings on their LPO Live label, including Brahms Symphonies No. 1 and No. 2, Mahler Symphonies No. 1 and No. 2, Rachmaninov’s Symphonic Dances, Tchaikovsky’s Symphonies 1, 4, 5, 6 and Manfred, and works by Turnage, Holst, Britten, Shostakovich, Honegger and Haydn. His tenure as Music Director at Glyndebourne has been documented in CD releases of La Cenerentola, Tristan und Isolde and Prokofiev’s Betrothal in a Monastery, and DVD releases of his performances of La Cenerentola, Gianni Schicchi, Die Fledermaus, Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg, Don Giovanni, and Rachmaninov’s The Miserly Knight, and other DVD releases include Hansel und Gretel from the Metropolitan Opera New York, his first concert as London Philharmonic Orchestra’s principal conductor featuring works by Wagner, Berg and Mahler, and DVDs with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment (Beethoven symphonies 4 and 7) and the Chamber Orchestra of Europe (Strauss and Ravel), all released by Medici Arts.

Season 2013/2014

 

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Reviews

"Throughout the performance Jurowski’s commanding appreciation and manipulation of the whole and of the details and minutiae was impressively assured; the merest sign from the baton, clear and precise, was all that the performers required, and confident, communal understanding was unfailingly evident. "

Claire Seymour, Opera Today, October 2013

"The greatest heroes of the occasion, though, are the London Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor Vladimir Jurowski, whose superb performance makes this Glyndebourne recording [of Tristan und Isolde] an indispensable addition to a Wagnerian’s collection, however large it may be "

Michael Tanner, BBC Music Magazine, September 2013

"The great strength here is musical fastidiousness. Leading his first Tristan, Vladimir Jurowski has imbued the performance with a special elegance and an unerring sense of proportion. Expressively speaking, absolutely nothing is exaggerated; even in Act 3 Jurowski never lets cumulative dramatic power interfere with his and his colleagues’ command of the score’s essential requirements. Much can be said for a Tristan in which a consistent, unaffected purity of musical approach comes squarely to the force."

Roger Pines, International Record Review of Glyndebourne "Tristan und Isolde", September 2013

"The most memorable Boston Symphony Orchestra performance of 2012 came in November, when the Russian conductor Vladimir Jurowski, in his BSO debut, led a searing account of Shostakovich’s Fourth Symphony. His music-making tends to crackle with fresh ideas and intellectual engagement. […] Jurowski’s podium technique prizes concision of gesture and he manages a striking degree of orchestral control through a minimum of motion. […] the musical insights and micro-sculpting of phrases kept the ear perpetually engaged. "

Jeremy Eichler, Boston Globe, June 2013

""Vladimir Jurowski conducts magnificently: aside from Mackerras himself, I've never heard [The Cunning Little Vixen] conducted with such colour, wit, detail and dramatic urgency; but there is also such tenderness and flexibility [...] there's not a single musical judgement that left me unconvinced.""

Nigel Simeone, International Record Review, May 2013

"Vladimir Jurowski shows himself a master of the Rossinian crescendo, building tension across long spans with daring intensity. Right from the start of the overture, he and the orchestra catch the chortles and chuckles of the music, and they go on to tap deep into the work’s whirlpool of emotions. The sound is light and airy, albeit with some wonderfully characterful rough edges from the instruments of the OAE, and La Cenerentola is revealed in all its musico-dramatic glory. "

John Allison, Opera Magazine

""Mahlerians know well the disjunction, sometimes dysfunction at work in [the Fifth] symphony. Jurowski’s genius was to enable some sort of connective narrative, which he did with visceral, incandescent brilliance, reflected in the LPO’s thrilling playing. Full of character and insight, this was a gripping performance. "

Peter Reed, www.classicalsource.com

"Jurowski's Shostakovich was one of the most thrilling BSO performances I've ever heard. [He] kept us totally riveted, even when we couldn't possibly predict where the next musical turn would abruptly take us. [...] Jurowski not only played the score, he played the orchestra; he even played the hall itself. Everything reverberated (in every sense). [...] Even in the most frenzied sections, you could hear every detail. The playing was magnificent, and precise. All of this was accomplished by Jurowski with unshowy, minimal, efficient gestures, yet you were never in doubt about his emotional intensity and commitment. "

Lloyd Schwartz, The Boston Phoenix

"Quite simply the most insightful, illuminating and uplifting performance that Mahler's Resurrection has enjoyed in a generation. You may think you know how Mahler's Second Symphony goes. Think again."

Edward Seckerson, Gramophone

"Keeping [Shostakovich Symphony No. 4] on track is an unenviable task and it’s clear that Jurowski scored an unqualified triumph in his BSO debut. The young Russian conductor had the full measure of this sprawling, unkempt yet consistently compelling work and motivated the Boston musicians to playing of a corporate power and intensity that literally had Symphony Hall’s wooden floors trembling. While Jurowski and the BSO punched across the untrammeled climaxes with tremendous force, it was the conductor’s taut yet flexible control in maintaining structural cohesion and the long view that was consistently impressive. Textures were remarkably transparent for all the massive forces and, individually and collectively, the musicians played for Jurowski with roiling commitment and often startling sonic fury. "

Lawrence A. Johnson, Boston Classical Review

"Jurowski was attentive to minute details in the score, creating a sense of riveting local drama, but also projected a vision for the broad arcs. The climaxes he built in the outer movements raged with an almost disconcertingly meticulous fury. The orchestra met him at every turn, and delivered some of the most forceful playing of the year, the sound balanced just right between fullness and bite, in the way that Shostakovich’s music demands. "

Jeremy Eichler, Boston Globe

"Surely the most interesting conductor of his generation."

James Inverne, Gramophone

"Vladimir Jurowski's subtle conducting elevates humanity above grandiose posturing."

Barry Millington, Evening Standard

"Looking around me at this point during the London Philharmonic's season-opening, Mahler cycle-launching performance under Vladimir Jurowski, I noticed almost everyone was wearing the same expression: open-mouthed but with fully alert, searching eyes. Not even halfway through this often bewildering work, such levels of engagement are a considerable achievement. You could have heard a pin drop. The performance was everything we've come to expect from the LPO and Jurowski: precise gestures, judiciously paced movement and wonderfully balanced sound. [...] As ever, though, it was the final movement – unfolding like an eternity captured in a single breath – that lingered, spreading its serene and supremely compassionate gaze long after the rapturous applause had died away."

Guy Dammann, The Guardian

"Electrifyingly done, The Rite of Spring was so engrossing that by the end we felt we were involved in something thrilling yet truly horrible. This was a great interpretation that added immeasurably to Jurowski's reputation as one of the leading Stravinskyans of our time. "

Tim Ashley, The Guardian

"As one now expects from Jurowski, the string sound was lighter and less searingly intense than maestros of an older generation tended to encourage in Tchaikovsky. Instead, there was a white-knuckle tension and a real sense of a wild and tragic story recounted with enthralling detail, vivid colour and pace"

Richard Morrison The Times

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Discography