David Daniels

Counter Tenor

Biography

David Daniels is known for his superlative artistry, magnetic stage presence and a voice of singular warmth and surpassing beauty, which have helped him redefine his voice category for the modern public. The American countertenor has appeared with the world’s major opera companies and on its main concert and recital stages. He made history as the first countertenor to give a solo recital in the main auditorium of Carnegie Hall. The Chicago Tribune has called Mr. Daniels “today’s gold standard among countertenors.” Gramophone magazine acknowledged his contribution to recorded excellence as well as his expansion of the repertoire for his voice type by naming him one of the “Top Ten Trailblazers” in classical music today.

In the 2016 – 2017 season, Mr. Daniels will return to The Metropolitan Opera for its 50th Anniversary Gala, and he will reprise his acclaimed performance of Bertarido in Handel’s Rodelinda at the Bolshoi. On the concert stage, he sings the role of Orfeo in Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra conducted by Robert Spano which will be recorded live, and he makes his debut with Boston Baroque as the alto soloist in Bach’s Mass in B minor, conducted by music director Martin Pearlman. Mr. Daniels will be the artist-in-residence with the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival this summer where he will sing three concerts featuring music of Vivaldi, Handel, and Hahn, as well as return to Wigmore Hall for a recital with Martin Katz.

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Reviews

“Mr. Daniels was superb, not only singing but also acting the role with a savvy Wildean mix of arrogance and vulnerability. His sustained tone was beautiful, and his occasional purposeful flirtations with a baritonal register were amusing.”

The New York Times

“Daniels portrays the cleaned-up Wilde with great sensitivity, and he sings most expressively.”

The Dallas Morning News

More Reviews

“Mr. Daniels was superb, not only singing but also acting the role with a savvy Wildean mix of arrogance and vulnerability. His sustained tone was beautiful, and his occasional purposeful flirtations with a baritonal register were amusing.”

The New York Times 

“Daniels portrays the cleaned-up Wilde with great sensitivity, and he sings most expressively.”

The Dallas Morning News 

“The performances and production were first rate, however. Mr. Morrison wrote the opera for the great countertenor David Daniels, and the vocal writing was tailored to show off his melting legato, with a little coloratura. Mr. Daniels stressed Wilde’s vulnerability in a sensitive portrayal.”

The Wall Street Journal 

“Mr. Daniels, who played Caesar at the Met in 2007 is again remarkable, singing with his full-bodied sound, emphatic delivery and technical command. He conveys the emperor’s vulnerability when he finds himself bewitched by Cleopatra or touched by the anguish of the suffering Cornelia. But when called for, Mr. Daniels can make fun of himself, as in a spirited aria when Caesar must rush from Cleopatra’s chambers to avoid the advancing forces of Ptolemy. As Mr. Daniels stops to dispatch bravura run after bravura run, Ms. Dessay’s frantic Cleopatra keeps trying to push him out the door to safety.”

The New York Times 

“To say that he is the most acclaimed countertenor of the day, perhaps the best ever, is to understate his achievement. He is simply a great singer.”

The New York Times