George Daugherty

Conductor

Biography

Conductor George Daugherty is one of the classical music world’s most diverse artists.   In addition to his 40-year conducting career which has included appearances with the world’s leading orchestras, ballet companies, opera houses, and concert artists, Daugherty is also an Emmy Award-winning / five-time Emmy nominated creator whose professional profile includes major credits as a director, writer, and producer for television, film, innovative and unique concerts, and the live theater.

Read more

Reviews

“With Daugherty on the podium, The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra played with staggering precision and magnificent gusto, bringing the rich and complicated textures of the complex film scores to life with extraordinary panache. At the finale, the sold-out Hollywood Bowl audience of 18,000 roared for more.”

The Los Angeles Times

“And the best reason to go to this concert? A robust and remarkable reading of the original concert version of the overture from Carousel. Daugherty and his Fort Worth Symphony players revealed this darkly off-kilter waltz to be the highly serious and substantial piece of music it really is.”

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram

More Reviews

“With Daugherty on the podium, The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra played with staggering precision and magnificent gusto, bringing the rich and complicated textures of the complex film scores to life with extraordinary panache. At the finale, the sold-out Hollywood Bowl audience of 18,000 roared for more.”

The Los Angeles Times

“And the best reason to go to this concert? A robust and remarkable reading of the original concert version of the overture from Carousel. Daugherty and his Fort Worth Symphony players revealed this darkly off-kilter waltz to be the highly serious and substantial piece of music it really is. ”

The Fort Worth Star-Telegram

“The Louisville Orchestra has never sounded better than it did at Thursday evening’s premiere of ‘Romeo and Juliet’; as conducted by Louisville Ballet music director George Daugherty. In response to Daugherty's fresh, intelligent, and powerfully eloquent interpretation of Prokofiev's inspired score, the orchestra came alive with extraordinary passion, heartbreaking expressiveness, staggering energy, and when ultimately called for, brutally tragic force. Daugherty's masterful grasp of the score resulted in maximum musical effect from the orchestra, as well as an unmistakably dramatic arc.”

The Louisville Courier-Journal

“For those who complain that’Bugs Bunny On Broadway’ is only cartoon music, conductor George Daugherty puts that point to rest with mercurial performances of Carl Stallings' music. Listen to the skittering rhythms, whimsical melodies, blue-note embellishments, and pop-tune quotations, and it's clear that Stalling… and Daugherty… know their way around a symphonic tone poem. The roaring kettledrums, the sweetly confiding strings, the braying brasses, and luxuriant woodwinds were every bit as vibrant as the colors and choreography of the animation on screen.”

The Chicago Tribune

“The Overture to Rossini ‘La Cenerentola’ energized the crowd, with rhythmic bite in the violins and real drive from the podium. But the very best came at the end, and it came with Tchaikovsky. And by the time the final ‘Theme and Variations’ from Tchaikovsky's Suite No. 3 for Orchestra came around, Daugherty's playful control of the score's delicious rhythms proved irresistible. For dance lovers, this is one score that cannot help but call up visions of Balanchine's 1947 ballet masterpiece’Theme and Variations’. Even without those associations, however, yesterday's performance was drenched in the spirit of dance. From the courtly beat of the initial statement of the theme by the strings, right through the whirlwind of joy that is the finale, Daugherty and his San Francisco Symphony musicians made sure everyone went home wearing a smile. The woodwinds were at their sweetest while gently echoing the theme at the heart of the piece. The fugue, a bouncy and furious affair, boasted superb string articulation. The heartbreaking melody that inspired Balanchine's great pas de deux was positively sensual in Daugherty's hands, more ‘American Ballet Theatre’ than’City Balle’ just right! The finale, a feast of rising modulations that is among Tchaikovsky's most exuberant pages, made the audience stand and cheer. ”

Octavio Roca, The San Francisco Chronicle