Jacquelyn Stucker



Hailed by The Boston Globe as “glowing,” “incandescent,” and “a singing actress to be reckoned with,” American soprano Jacquelyn Stucker is being recognized internationally as a versatile singer of new and interesting repertoire ranging from concert works to opera to contemporary music.

Praised for her “dark-tinged soprano with a dusky lower register,” Jacquelyn will begin a two-year engagement this autumn with the Royal Opera House at Covent Garden as a Jette Parker Young Artist. She will make both her Covent Garden Debut and her Bayerische Staatsoper debut as Azema in David Alden’s new production of Semiramide. She will also perform as Frasquita in Barrie Kosky’s production of Carmen and the production will be broadcast worldwide in March 2018 as part of the Royal Opera House’s Live Cinema Season. She will also be featured in recital through the Royal Opera House: a solo recital of European premieres of music by John Harbison and Mark Kilstofte, and a staged recital with baritone Dominic Sedgwick and pianist David Gowland of Wolf’s Italienisches Liederbuch.

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“Jacquelyn Stucker displays an exceptionally beautiful soprano as Azema on her Royal Opera debut…”

Sam Smith


“Feral and feisty from the first, soprano Jacquelyn Stucker brought a magnetic presence and a shimmering gold timbre to the title character.”

Kate Stringer

The Boston Musical Intelligencer

More Reviews

“Jacquelyn Stucker was a bright-voiced Azema…”

Mark Pullinger, Bachtrack November 2017

“Jacquelyn Stucker’s fluent Azema…”

George Hall, The Stage November 2017

“the pure-toned Jacquelyn Stucker, who incarnates the strait-jacketed princess, copes heroically with the director’s requirement that she should alternate between convulsive fits and catatonic trances.”

Michael Church, The Independent November 2017

“..Jacquelyn Stucker’s Azema was assured and inappropriately handled by her various suitors.”

Peter Reed, classicalsource.com November 2017

“Soprano Jacquelyn Stucker made a noteworthy debut in the boy role of Oberto, especially in the embellishments she added to the da capo of her final aria, ‘Barbara! io ben lo so.”

Charles T. Downey, The Classical Review July 2017

“soprano Jacquelyn Stucker was an endearing presence in the part, which she infused with earnest energy and a sweet sound.”

James M. Keller, The Santa Fe New Mexican July 2017

“Stucker’s a singer to watch. She’s got a wonderfully lithe instrument, dusky-warm in its low- to mid-register and clear like [a] bell up above. Her tone production throughout is consistent and, while she’s got a good-sized voice, there’s a lightness to her singing that allows her to navigate florid passagework seemingly with ease.”

Jonathan Blumhofer, ArtsFuse March 2017

Displaying a dark-tinged soprano with a dusky lower register, Stucker gave notice she is a singing actress to be reckoned with. Alternately pleading and cajoling in lovely tones, she brought power and strength at the top range as Elle turned agitated and angry.

Lawrence Budmen, South Florida Classical Review  February 2015