Nicholas Phan

Tenor

Biography

Appearing regularly in the world’s premiere concert halls, music festivals and opera houses, American tenor Nicholas Phan continues to distinguish himself as one of the most compelling tenors performing today.

Highlights of Mr. Phan’s upcoming 2017/2018 season include his debuts with the Minnesota Orchestra for Bach’s Christmas Oratorio, and the Orquestra Sinfônica de São Paulo for Britten’s War Requiem with Marin Alsop; and returns to the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Philharmonia Baroque, the Philadelphia Orchestra, the Chicago Symphony for Schubert’s Mass in E-flat with Riccardo Muti, and the Toronto Symphony for performances as the title role in Bernstein’s Candide.  He also serves as artistic director of two festivals next season: Collaborative Arts Institute of Chicago’s sixth annual Collaborative Works Festival, and as the first singer to be guest Artistic Director of the Laguna Beach Music Festival.

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Reviews

“…Between these two pieces, tenor Nicholas Phan nearly stole the show with his poised, ironic portrayal of the swan roasting on a spit. This treacherously high aria, “Olim lacus colueram,” is the only solo tenor moment in the work, and it is often comically overplayed by singers without the notes — or, much worse, sung by a countertenor in pretty tones, ruining Orff’s intended effect of vocal strain and discomfort. Phan sang well, while deftly imparting the misery of a cooked bird heading for the blue-plate special.”

Opera News

“Tenor Nicholas Phan was exquisite to hear, giving just enough emotional color to lyrics to show he was a master of the subtle approach. His beautiful interpretations were implicit advocacy for the vocal repertoire of composer Benjamin Britten.”

Creative Loafing Atlanta

More Reviews

“…Between these two pieces, tenor Nicholas Phan nearly stole the show with his poised, ironic portrayal of the swan roasting on a spit. This treacherously high aria, “Olim lacus colueram,” is the only solo tenor moment in the work, and it is often comically overplayed by singers without the notes — or, much worse, sung by a countertenor in pretty tones, ruining Orff’s intended effect of vocal strain and discomfort. Phan sang well, while deftly imparting the misery of a cooked bird heading for the blue-plate special.”

Opera News 

“Tenor Nicholas Phan was exquisite to hear, giving just enough emotional color to lyrics to show he was a master of the subtle approach. His beautiful interpretations were implicit advocacy for the vocal repertoire of composer Benjamin Britten.”

Creative Loafing Atlanta 

“…Nicholas Phan, making his name widely as a Britten tenor, sang the “Nocturne” beautifully and strongly…the Keats setting “What Is More Gentle Than a Wind in Summer?” was particularly gorgeous, with, again, wonderful contributions from those woodwind players…”

The New York Times 

“…The tenor Nicholas Phan, singing with a mix of sweet sound and impetuous temperament, was excellent in the dramatic recitatives relating the story of the trial of Christ before the crucifixion. Mr. Phan and Mr. Davies brought out the best in each other during the wistfully beautifully duet “Et misericordia” from the Bach Magnificat, one of the high points of the fresh, stylistically insightful performance Mr. Suzuki drew from his forces. This was a great start to what could be the sleeper event of the Philharmonic season.”

The New York Times 

“…Between these two pieces, tenor Nicholas Phan nearly stole the show with his poised, ironic portrayal of the swan roasting on a spit. This treacherously high aria, “Olim lacus colueram,” is the only solo tenor moment in the work, and it is often comically overplayed by singers without the notes — or, much worse, sung by a countertenor in pretty tones, ruining Orff’s intended effect of vocal strain and discomfort. Phan sang well, while deftly imparting the misery of a cooked bird heading for the blue-plate special”

Opera News