Patrick Carfizzi

Bass-Baritone

Biography

In the 2021-2022 season, American bass-baritone Patrick Carfizzi marks the twenty-second anniversary of his Metropolitan Opera debut by returning to the company as the Sacristan in Tosca, conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin, the Speaker in The Magic Flute, and the Lackey in Ariadne auf Naxos. Last season, he returned to Santa Fe Opera as both Bartolo in Le nozze di Figaro and Starveling in A Midsummer Night’s Dream, returned to San Diego Opera to reprise his celebrated Dr. Bartolo in Il barbiere di Siviglia, and sang Dr. Dulcamara in L’elisir d’amore in a recording made with Seattle Opera. He had also been scheduled to join the Metropolitan Opera as Dr. Bartolo in Il barbiere di Siviglia, Houston Grand Opera as Don Magnifico in La Cenerentola, and Arizona Opera as Dr. Dulcamara.

During the 2019-2020 season, Mr. Carfizzi returned to the Metropolitan Opera as the Speaker, Brander in La damnation de Faust, conducted by Edward Gardner, and the Sacristan in the New Year’s Eve gala featuring Anna Netrebko and conducted by Yannick Nézet-Séguin. He also returned to Minnesota Opera as Dr. Bartolo in Il barbiere di Siviglia, and had been scheduled to sing Dr. Dulcamara at the Hessisches Staatstheater Wiesbaden.

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Reviews

“Arguably the show’s very finest singing came from the accomplished Bartolo, Patrick Carfizzi…Mr. Carfizzi’s impressive bass is as powerful as it is handsome. Make no mistake, he certainly knows how to use a full arsenal of buffo vocal tricks and colors to nail his laughs and etch his scheming Don, but then he can suddenly take our breath away with a finely sung declamation that is remarkably elegant.”

Opera Today

“Patrick Carfizzi — wonderful comic actor and fine singer who knew how, when it made sense, to draw on Rossini’s vocal ornamentation to considerable comic effect.”

Opera News

More Reviews

”Mr. Carfizzi has a substantial, mellifluous bass that shone splendidly in his Act II aria, which was a virtual feast of sonorous tone and characterful nattering. As a shameless, rubber-faced, loose-limbed comedian, Patrick also evinced some of the evening’s best laughs.”
 Opera Today, James Sohre

“Patrick Carfizzi contributes the rare commodity of a Sacristan sung with musical polish.” 
Financial Times, George Loomis

“The standout of the supporting cast was the delightfully harried sacristan of Patrick Carfizzi who brought a voice of rare fullness and color for a comic baritone role.”  
New York Classical Review,
Eric Simpson

“Carfizzi brings down the house with the impeccable “Pirates” patter-song, “Modern Major General,” but he also gets to display his rich bass-baritone in his second act pastoral aria, “Sighing Softly to The River.”
Times of San Diego, Pat Launer

“The singing is strong throughout the lead roles, but it’s bass-baritone Patrick Carfizzi who steals the show as Major-General Stanley. Besides breezing through the rapid-patter song “I Am the Very Model of a Modern Major-General,” Carfizzi hilariously trots and high-steps and pirouettes around the stage as he sings.”
San Diego Union Tribune, Pam Kragen

“The agent who drives the romantic intrigues, an older gentleman named Don Alfonso, becomes a professor, and it works brilliantly. The role is taken by bass-baritone Patrick Carfizzi, who relishes in Alfonso’s chicanery throughout the proceedings. Carfizzi’s command of the comic bass style is unassailable.” The Daily Camera, Kelly Dean Hansen

“Bass-baritone Patrick Carfizzi’s Dr. Dulcamara was a lovable charlatan—nimble onstage and equipped with a crisp delivery for the con man’s rapid, pattering asides.”  Opera News, Gregory Barnett

“Patrick Carfizzi was an ebullient Dulcamara, peddler of patent elixirs” Wall Street Journal, Heidi Waleson

“Patrick Carfizzi brought his considerable talents to the role of Brander in his Act One aria. He brings great style to everything he sings.” Broadway World, George Weinhouse

“Brander, a student who frequents the tavern in Leipzig, makes only one appearance, but Patrick Carfizzi stood out in his brief time on stage. He offered a viscous, warm bass-baritone and sly comic instincts in his delivery of the Song of the Rat.”  New York Classical Review, Eric C. Simpson

 

More Reviews

“Arguably the show’s very finest singing came from the accomplished Bartolo, Patrick Carfizzi…Mr. Carfizzi’s impressive bass is as powerful as it is handsome. Make no mistake, he certainly knows how to use a full arsenal of buffo vocal tricks and colors to nail his laughs and etch his scheming Don, but then he can suddenly take our breath away with a finely sung declamation that is remarkably elegant.”

Opera Today 

“Patrick Carfizzi — wonderful comic actor and fine singer who knew how, when it made sense, to draw on Rossini’s vocal ornamentation to considerable comic effect.”

Opera News 

“Carfizzi’s performance is worth the price of the ticket and will be remembered as a role-defining portrayal of Dr. Bartolo. – Central City Opera, Barber of Seville “

The Mountain-Ear 

“Patrick Carfizzi, the warm bass who sang the role of Mary’s friend and adviser Talbot, sang with a rich sound and complete emotional involvement so that his character sprang to life. “

Washington Post 

“As Figaro, Patrick Carfizzi displayed a robust and rich voice with the ability to produce powerful and delicately sweet sounds, along with the dramatic skill to convincingly portray Figaro’s complex character.”

The Wichita Eagle 

“With impeccable comic timing and richly nuanced bass-baritone voice, Patrick Carfizzi set the gold standard as the malevolent buffoon of a father Don Magnifico.”

Oregon Music News 

“The magical scene stealer, Patrick Carfizzi as the lovesick Papageno, keeps the audience laughing. Carfizzi’s comic genius includes spontaneous interactions with the audience and delivering perfectly timed comic phrases.”

Marilee Vergati, examiner.com 

“In the role of Papageno…bass-baritone Patrick Carfizzi nearly steals the evening with not only his voice, but his onstage shtick that adds to the comic nature of the role and gets the biggest laughs in the piece.”

John Norine, Jr., TheaterJones 

“Patrick Carfizzi created a delightfully pompous Dr. Bartolo, who boiled with frustration in his vain attempts to stop Rosina from meeting Almaviva. During the singing lesson in Act II, Carfizzi used his incredible falsetto and an incredibly silly impromptu dance to cause laughter to cascade from all corners of the hall.”

James Bash, Oregon Music News 

“Grand, perfect singing came from bass-baritones Patrick Carfizzi and Kyle Ketelsen, respectively as Dr. Bartolo and Don Basilio.”

Theodore Bale, Culturemap Houston 

“Patrick Carfizzi (HGO fans will remember his stunning performance as Swallow in Peter Grimes), a Figaro who is simultaneously animated and confident. There has to be sex appeal in this part, and Carfizzi most certainly possesses it.”

Theodore Bale, CultureMap Houston 

“Patrick Carfizzi brought a sonorous bass-baritone to the role of Kissinger and lascivious relish to his alter ego.”

Lawrence A. Johnson, South Florida Classical Review 

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