Simon Trpčeski

Piano

Biography

Macedonian pianist Simon Trpčeski has established himself as one of the most remarkable musicians to have emerged in recent years, performing with many of the world’s greatest orchestras and captivating audiences worldwide.  Mr. Trpčeski is praised not only for his impeccable technique and delicate expression, but also for his warm personality and commitment to strengthening Macedonia’s cultural image.

Mr. Trpčeski is a frequent soloist in the UK with the London Symphony, City of Birmingham Symphony, the Philharmonia, Halle, the Royal Liverpool and the London Philharmonic orchestras.  Other engagements with major European ensembles include the Royal Concertgebouw, Russian National and Bolshoi Theatre orchestras, NDR Sinfonieorchester Hamburg, DSO and RSO Berlin, WDR Cologne, MDR Leipzig, Tonkünstler Orchestra in Vienna, the Danish National Symphony Orchestra and the Rotterdam, Strasbourg, Royal Stockholm, Helsinki, Oslo, Royal Flanders and St. Petersburg philharmonic orchestras.

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Reviews

“Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G positively glittered, thanks to pianist Simon Trpčeski, whose playing was witty, buoyant and always in cahoots with the orchestra.”

Erica Jeal

The Guardian

“The most notable aspect that Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski and Gaffigan brought to Rachmaninoff’s “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” — and it’s a big one — was wit. Very few would associate the quality of wit with this composer, but aside from the ingeniously rapturous 18th variation, the “Rhapsody” has it in spades, and Trpceski brought it out with his crisp, crystalline, lightly pedaled playing, as did Gaffigan in his brash, alert conducting. As a result, this piano concerto-in-all-but-name sounded fresh and alive.”

Richard S. Ginell

Los Angeles Times

More Reviews

“..and the smiling Macedonian pianist produced pearls of brilliance, wistfulness and wit […] this performance too confirmed Trpčeski as belonging to that rare breed of musician who allies a flawless technique and concentration of expression with a natural gift for communication. He has bravura and charisma and Rachmaninov has never sounded so good.”

David Truslove, Classical Source 

“Mr. Trpceski was everywhere fluent, muscular and athletic in double-octave passages, light and humorous in more pointed moments.”

James R. Oestreich, The New York Times 

“Ravel’s Piano Concerto in G positively glittered, thanks to pianist Simon Trpčeski, whose playing was witty, buoyant and always in cahoots with the orchestra.”

The Guardian, Erica Jeal 

“The most notable aspect that Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski and Gaffigan brought to Rachmaninoff’s “Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini” — and it’s a big one — was wit. Very few would associate the quality of wit with this composer, but aside from the ingeniously rapturous 18th variation, the “Rhapsody” has it in spades, and Trpceski brought it out with his crisp, crystalline, lightly pedaled playing, as did Gaffigan in his brash, alert conducting. As a result, this piano concerto-in-all-but-name sounded fresh and alive. ”

Richard S. Ginell, Los Angeles Times 

“Trpčeski’s balance, clarity and suave, supple eloquence took Poulenc’s music as seriously as it deserves.”

The Artsdesk, Jessica Duchen 

“Trpceski is a remarkable pianist, smartly blending restraint, sense of tonal color and knowing when and how much to unleash bravado, in measured doses.”

Josef Woodard, Los Angeles Times 

“Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski, in a welcome return to the BSO, tackled the work with tireless bravura and keen musicality.”

Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun 

“The young Macedonian pianist was all grace and eloquence. He found the natural inner flow of the Grieg, its stream of melody. His tone has an understated beauty.”

Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times 

“Playing Rachmaninoff’s widely beloved Piano Concerto No. 2, the artist fully lived up to the high expectations set by his Cleveland Orchestra debut at Blossom Music Center in 2009. As at Blossom, the pianist at Severance proved an artist of unique but highly alluring character. His performance stripped away much of the well-known work’s typical gloss and thickness and instead cast it in a refreshingly bright, clear light. Yet it didn’t lack feeling. Trpceski’s account of the Adagio with clarinetist Daniel McKelway was spellbinding in the utmost, and where the composer waxes rhapsodic, the pianist poured forth impassioned streams.”

Zachary Lewis, Cleveland Plain Dealer 

“Electrifying virtuosity, but no whiff of show-off. The most delicate feelings, yet nothing precious or lacy. Head plus heart, lots of heart.”

Geoff Brown, The London Times